Comprehensive Optometry

Optometry Tucson AZ

General Optometry

Our practice tests vision and provides prescriptions for eyeglasses and contact lenses when necessary. We use state-of-the-art equipment and techniques to evaluate and maintain your overall eye health.

If any eye health issues are detected, an individualized treatment program will be designed to address the condition or prevent it from progressing.

» Learn More About Vision Exams.

Diagnosis & Treatment of Eye Diseases & Eye Infections

Comprehensive eye examinations should be a regular part of every person's healthcare routine. They are an important tool in eye health by detecting and preventing eye diseases and evaluating the overall health of the patient. Some diseases, such as glaucoma, develop gradually without symptoms of pain or vision loss, so patients may not notice that anything is wrong until significant and irreversible damage has been done. Early detection of eye diseases allows for a choice of treatment options and a reduced risk of permanent damage.

There are many different types of infections that can affect the eyes.They may be bacterial, viral or fungal in nature and may strike both eyes or only one. Eye infections often cause the following symptoms: Redness, inflammation, pain, itchiness, discharge, or vision problems.

Depending on the cause of the infection, it may be treated by antibiotic or antiviral eye drops, application of topical ointments or the use of warm compresses.

Diabetic Eye Exams

Diabetic eye conditions can be detected through a comprehensive eye exam. A comprehensive eye exam involves a visual acuity test to measure vision at various distances, and a dilated eye exam to examine the structures of the eye for any signs of disease. During this test, your doctor can examine the retina and optic nerve with a special magnifying lens. Tonometry may also be performed during a comprehensive eye exam to measure the pressure inside the eye with a special instrument.

» Learn More About Diabetic Eye Conditions and Treatment.

Plaquenil Eye Exams

Plaquenil, also known as hydroxychloroquine, is a medication used in the treatment or prevention of malaria. It has also been used to treat other conditions, such as liver disease, that may have been caused by the same parasites that cause malaria. Plaquenil has also been used to treat the symptoms of arthritis, lupus and dermatologic conditions.

Plaquenil can prove toxic to the retina, threatening the vision. Regular eye examinations are essential for those patients taking plaquenil because over time the retina can become damaged beyond repair. Regular medical monitoring is the only way to ensure that toxicity is not occurring. The drug accumulates within the retina and can remain there long after drug use has been discontinued.

Before beginning treatment with plaquenil, the doctor will perform a baseline eye examination and the following tests: Dilated Retinal Examination, Retinal Photography, Visual Field Test, OCT.

The risk of developing retinopathy increases with the length of time plaquenil has been taken and the dosage prescribed.

Glaucoma Management & Therapeutic Treatment

Once glaucoma has been diagnosed, treatment should begin as soon as possible to help minimize the risk of permanent vision loss. There is no cure for glaucoma, so treatment focuses on preventing further damage from occurring. Most cases of glaucoma can be treated with eye drops, laser surgery or microsurgery. The best treatment for your individual case depends on the type and severity of the disease, and can be discussed with your doctor.

» Learn More About Glaucoma and Glaucoma Treatments.

Preoperative & Postoperative Cataract Surgery

Cataracts caused by aging develop gradually, and patients may not notice the early vision changes they cause. It is only when their cataracts start interfering with vision that patients may become aware of them. A comprehensive eye examination will detect cataracts, and rule out other causes for vision issues, such as glaucoma or macular degeneration. Patients who become aware of visual difficulties related to cataracts usually experience, especially at night, clouded, blurred or dim vision.

Immediately after surgery, an eye patch is worn; some doctors advise wearing a protective shield, even when sleeping, for several days. Vision may be blurry at first, but improves within a few days. Some itching and discomfort are also present for a few days, but it is important that a patient not rub or exert pressure on the treated eye. Heavy lifting should be avoided. Eye drops to prevent inflammation and infection, and control eye pressure are prescribed.

Even though full healing can take up to 2 months, because cataract surgery is performed on one eye at a time, daily activities can be resumed in a few days. Most patients need to wear eyeglasses, for at least some tasks, after surgery. If the other eye also has a cataract, which is usually the case, the second surgery is scheduled a month or two after the first.

» Learn More About Cataracts.

Specialty Contact Lenses / Contact Lenses

A contact lens is a thin disk which floats on the surface of the eye, providing vision correction. With advances in optical technology, almost everyone now can wear contact lenses, regardless of the type or extent of their vision problems. This includes patients with astigmatism and those who need bifocal or multifocal lenses. Our practice offers a comprehensive array of contact lenses to suit our patients' individual needs - from daily disposables or extended-wear soft contacts to rigid gas-permeable lenses. We can help you find out which contact lenses are best for you. There are two classifications of contact lenses - soft and rigid gas permeable lenses. All contact lenses require a prescription.